For 2020, the state of California is increasing the minimum wage to $13, a dollar more than the minimum wage in 2019. Although this is a part of California’s plan for a $15 minimum wage by 2023, several cities within California have established their own minimum wage laws, a few of which have already surpassed the $15 minimum wage.

Here is a full list of municipalities with separate minimum wage laws going into effect in 2020:

  • Alameda ($15 an hour on July 1, 2020)
  • Belmont ($15 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Berkeley ($15.59 an hour and indexed to inflation on July 1, 2020)
  • Cupertino ($15.35 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Daly City ($13.75 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • El Cerrito ($15.37 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020
  • Emeryville ($16.42 an hour and indexed to inflation on July 1, 2020)
  • Fremont ($13.50 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Los Altos ($15.40 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Los Angeles ($14.25 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Los Angeles County ($14.25 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Malibu ($14.25 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Menlo Park ($15 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Milpitas ($15 an hour and indexed to inflation on July 1, 2020)
  • Mountain View ($16.05 an hour and indexed to inflation on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Oakland ($14.14 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Palo Alto ($15.40 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Pasadena ($14.25 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Petaluma ($14 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Redwood City ($15.38 an hour and indexed to inflation on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Richmond ($15 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • San Diego ($13 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • San Francisco ($15.59 an hour and indexed to inflation on July 1, 2019)
  • San Jose ($15.25 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • San Leandro ($15 an hour on July 1, 2020)
  • San Mateo ($15.38 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Santa Clara ($15.40 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Santa Monica ($15 an hour on July 1, 2020)
  • Santa Rosa ($14 an hour for small employers and $15 an hour for large employers on July 1, 2020)
  • Sonoma ($12.50 an hour for small employers and $13.50 an hour for large employers on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • South San Francisco ($15 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)
  • Sunnyvale ($16.05 an hour on Jan. 1, 2020)

Minimum wage isn’t the only law changing this new year, with California’s new sick leave law also kicking into effect. In the state of California, the new sick leave law is as follows: 24 hours lump sum with an accrual of 1 hour for every 30 hours worked. The sick leave law also has an accrual cap of 48 hours per year and a use cap of 24 hours per year.

Much like the minimum wage laws, several municipalities have their respective sick leave laws:

  • Berkeley

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked (can do lump sum, but the accrual method will kick in after lump sum has been earned)

Accrual cap: 48 hours or 72 hours per year (depending on employer size)

Use cap: 48 hours per year for small employers only

  • Emeryville

Lump Sum: 48 hours or 72 hours (depending on employer size)

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked

Accrual cap: 48 hours or 72 hours per year (depending on employer size)

Use cap: not permitted

  • Oakland

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked

Accrual cap: 40 hours or 72 hours per year (depending on employer size)

Use cap: not permitted

  • San Francisco

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked (can do lump sum, but the accrual method will kick in after lump sum has been earned)

Accrual cap: 40 hours or 72 hours per year (depending on employer size)

Use cap: not permitted

  • Los Angeles

Lump Sum: 48 hours

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked

Accrual cap: 72 hours per year

Use cap: 48 hours per year

  • San Diego

Lump Sum: 40 hours

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked

Accrual cap: 80 hours per year

Use cap: 40 hours per year

  • Santa Monica

Lump Sum: 40 hours or 72 hours (depending on employer size)

Accrual: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked

Accrual cap: 40 hours or 72 hours per year (depending on employer size)

Use cap: not permitted

In the new year, make your company is compliant with the new minimum wage and workplace laws. For more information or assistance, feel free to contact us.

DISCLAIMER: Content within this post should not be considered legal advice and is for informational purposes only. Communications made through this post do not create an attorney-client relationship. Hackler Flynn & Associates is not responsible for any content that you may access from third-party resources that may be accessed through or linked to this post.

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